9 thoughts on “D10a – Berry

    1. Pentetic acid is actually a chelating agent, which means that has a strong affinity for metals, and therefore, wraps around them and is expelled through your urine. So, a side effect of using pentetic acid would be the fact that it could remove essential metals/ions from the body. However, this is easily reversed by re-introducing metals back into the body since it has a stronger affinity for metals, rather than bacterial cells.

  1. Was your group the only group to use this acid? If I understood right, this drug is already FDA approved. Can you explain why it was used if it’s already an FDA approved drug?

    1. I’m not sure if we were the only group to, but within my section of the lab, we were! So pentetic acid is a chelating agent, and these types of compounds have a strong affinity for heavy metals. They work by binding to a metal and wrapping around it, creating a sort of bubble. Therefore, lets say you ingest too much iron, the doctor would administer pentetic acid into your body, which would bind with the iron, wrap around the metal, and you would expel it through your urine, reducing the toxic level of heavy metal within your body!

  2. Thank you for your presentation!! When you discuss the materials and methods, you discuss how you diluted at a 1:5 and 1:10 concentration. Why did you choose to dilute the pentetic acid in those specific two separate concentrations and do you expect other concentrations to lead to similar results?

    1. So when researching antibiotics, you want to find a dosage that is the most effective, but is not toxic. Since antibiotics can’t differentiate between bacterial cells and your own cells, too much of an antibiotic can cause unwanted harm. So the goal with the dilutions is to create a dose-response curve. Which dosages would give us the no growth response we wanted, but with causing the least amount of harm. So while both dilutions resulted in some dosages with no growth, we wanted to know how low we could get, and that is why we tested more than one dilution series.

    1. So when researching antibiotics, you want to find a dosage that is the most effective, but is not toxic. Since antibiotics can’t differentiate between bacterial cells and your own cells, too much of an antibiotic can cause unwanted harm. So the goal with the dilutions is to create a dose-response curve. Which dosages would give us the no growth response we wanted, but with causing the least amount of harm. So while both dilutions resulted in some dosages with no growth, we wanted to know how low we could get, and that is why we tested more than one dilution series.

    2. I got the same question above, which has a bit more detail! However, basically, we want to create the best dose-response curve we can, so we wanted to test different dilution series to see how close we could get to a dosage that killed as many bacteria as possible, without causing harm to our body. Also! wanted to find a dosage too low that caused growth, our goal was to find the “sweet spot”.

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