14 thoughts on “D11B – McGarry

  1. Great presentation! What other drugs do you think would be a good candidate for chemotherapy, that aren’t in use today?

    1. The other drug my group wanted to present on (before choosing Oleuropein) was Vidatox, which is blue scorpion venom.

  2. Hi! I enjoyed your presentation! I was wonder what would allow Oleuropein to be classified as a poison?

    1. Oleuropein could be counted as a poison if the lowest dose and highest dose both resulted in the same number of larvae deaths. Because a higher concentration killed more flies we were able to deduce it isn’t a poison because the concentration controlled percent survival, however if the concentration had no power over percent survival we could call it a poison.

  3. In your hypothesis – Why did you think that it would have an additive effect when used along with radiation?

    1. My group initially predicted this as a guess; because Oleuropein only worked to kill off and slow the growth/movement of new cells we didn’t see anything that made it stand out as a chemotherapy. Also, before we started this experiment, Oleuropein wasn’t looking like a HIT for our dilution series, so we assumed it also wouldn’t be synergistic.

  4. From your hypothesis – What lead you to believe that it would be an additive when used alongside radiation?

    1. My group initially predicted this as a guess; because Oleuropein only worked to kill off and slow the growth/movement of new cells we didn’t see anything that made it stand out as a chemotherapy. Also, before we started this experiment, Oleuropein wasn’t looking like a HIT for our dilution series, so we assumed it also wouldn’t be synergistic.

  5. Great presentation! I was wondering if you thought that Oleuropein had any antimicrobial properties that could be worth looking into for the development of future antibiotics?

    1. Yes, Oleuropein is already considered a plain antimicrobial, especially with foodborne pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, Salmonella…). I think it would be helpful in future antibiotics as it does have killing tendencies against rapidly dividing organisms, even though it wasn’t a hit.

  6. Do you think that the use of flies could lead to future possibilities with mice or other live, smaller animals?

    1. Yes definitely! The reason we originally used flies was they were easy available as well as more ethical to begin testing on. In the future we would test Oleuropein further to see at what concentration it is a HIT and from there, after having success on larvae we would strive to test on cancer cells in mice or other small vertebrates.

  7. Do you think that the successful use of flies could lead to future direction with mice or other small, live animals?

    1. Yes definitely! The reason we originally used flies was they were easy available as well as more ethical to begin testing on. In the future we would test Oleuropein further to see at what concentration it is a HIT and from there, after having success on larvae we would strive to test on cancer cells in mice or other small vertebrates.

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