10 thoughts on “D18 – Akerson

  1. Very interesting work! How would you determine a starting dosage for ginkgetin treatments for these trials and would different forms of administration affect the effectiveness of ginkgetin?

    1. In all honesty the max dose was determined based on how much compound we were able to obtain! We wanted to run two trials – Max Dose trial and our Dilution Experiment so we needed enough compound to be able to successfully run both trials. We know from our literature reviews that the biological max dosage for any compound in the blood is 10 mM, and we were running our samples are WAY lower concentrations (50 uM was our maximum dose). Therefore, our max dose was limited by our availability, not by the biochemical mechanisms by which we were running this compound through. To answer your second question, if we were to administer this compound orally (that is, in a human, not for Drosophila Melanogaster) the dosage would have to be much higher because the absorption rate of an oral dose is much slower than that of an IV-administered drug. Thank you for the thoughtful question!

  2. Why did having less than 10 casings make two positive control samples and one negative control sample statistically unreliable?

    1. Great question! At 10 or fewer observations of data, the sample size is too small to draw any significant conclusions. If we saw a pattern in our data based off of those 10 pupal casings, we not be able to conclusively say if this was because of chance or not.

  3. Why did having fewer than 10 pupal casings make two positive control samples and one negative control sample statistically unreliable?

    1. Wild Type flies mean the flies do not have any mutations in their DNA damage response pathway that affect their sensitivity to chemotherapy or radiation (that we know of!). Often, mutant flies are used because they are more sensitive to radiation, but we decided to use WT flies because it is a better model to test cancer!

  4. Very nice work! How did you choose the maximum dosage in your experiments? And for future works, will you keep the maximum dosage and dilution trials, or having additional dosage scales?

    1. Great question! I talked a little bit about this up above but we chose our max dose based on our availability of the compound, since we were only able to access a tiny amount of Ginkgetin. In an ideal world, we would test at higher doses to see how effective Ginkgetin can be, especially at doses closer to the biological maximum (closer to 10 mM, as opposed to what we tested which was 50 uM).

  5. Great question! I talked a little bit about this up above but we chose our max dose based on our availability of the compound, since we were only able to access a tiny amount of Ginkgetin. In an ideal world, we would test at higher doses to see how effective Ginkgetin can be, especially at doses closer to the biological maximum (closer to 10 mM, as opposed to what we tested which was 50 uM).

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