10 thoughts on “G9 – Martindale

  1. What is your hypothesis for potential results of your gene knockout experiment? Do you think the absence of that gene will render the phage more or less infective?

    1. Great question! We were thinking that these repetitive sequences could possibly increase infectivity of the phage by making their tail proteins better at recognizing bacterial receptors. So knocking them out might prevent the phage from infecting its host (Mycobacterium smegmatis) which we would see as a lack of plaque formation on an M. smeg lawn.

  2. Great presentation! What were some limitations in your experiment that made you decide what future experiments were necessary?

    1. The main limitation is that the repetitive sequences aren’t very large, so our bioinformatic tools can’t determine if they possess a certain domain that has a specific function. However, through laboratory experiments, we could change the sequences and observe how it affects the phage’s infectivity of its host.

  3. Great presentation! What were some limitations in your study that led you to decide what future experiments should be done?

    1. The main limitation is that the repetitive sequences aren’t very large, so our bioinformatic tools can’t determine if they possess a certain domain that has a specific function. However, through laboratory experiments, we could change the sequences and observe how it affects the phage’s infectivity of its host.

  4. Hi Rachel!

    I am curious about the inversion mutation. What do you hypothesize is the reason for inversion mutations actually being beneficial? Is the inversion just the exact same reading frame being read the same direction (AUG to Stop) just against the direction of the “normal” genes?

    Thanks,
    Jake Carter

    1. We hypothesized that the inversion mutations could be the phage’s mechanism for increasing diversity in the minor tail proteins. Some ideas we had were that this diversity could broaden the phage’s host range or increase its infectivity since tail proteins have to bind the bacterial receptors in order to infect them. The inversion is in the same reading frame. Imagine that a portion of double stranded DNA is flipped 180 degrees and then inserted in the same spot. That’s an inversion!

  5. We hypothesized that the inversion mutations could be the phage’s mechanism for increasing diversity in the minor tail proteins. Some ideas we had were that this diversity could broaden the phage’s host range or increase its infectivity since tail proteins have to bind the bacterial receptors in order to infect them. The inversion is in the same reading frame. Imagine that a portion of double stranded DNA is flipped 180 degrees and then inserted in the same spot. That’s an inversion!

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