8 thoughts on “P64 – White

  1. Hi Joey,
    Great poster presentation. I was very impressed with the amount of knowledge I learned in such a short video. I really enjoyed your pace of talking throughout the presentation as well as provided examples because it allowed me to take the time to process what you were saying about the phage research.

    In addition, one question I have for you is about modifying a naturally lysogenic phage to a lytic phage. How common is this procedure and if experiments have been conducted prior to your research, how effective was the modification process of the phage repressor gene?

    1. Removing the repressor gene is a relatively straightforward procedure that has been done with success a number of times. It is however much more difficult than simply selecting a different phage to use as part of your cocktail, so if that’s an option it is generally preferred…
      Here are some papers talking about genetic modification of phages in case your interested!

      https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0437-z
      https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2019.00954/full

  2. Hello Joey,

    Thank you for this explanation of your findings and the conclusions that you have derived from said findings. In your results, I think you mention that your phage demonstrates both lytic and lysogenic morphology. I was curious as to whether you had insight on factors that may have caused some subpopulations of your phage to undergo lytic growth while others went through lysogenic growth? Were nutrients applied in an asymmetric way on the plate, or is there some other factor that you think is at play here?

    1. Great question. The reason we see both lytic and lysogenic lifecycles in this phage is (likely) because it is a temperate phage. As the why subpopulations are undergoing different life cycles: this is likely because during the early stages of the incubation period (seen in the clear regions in the centers of the plaques), there are relatively few phage particles present on the plate and the bacteria are rapidly dividing. As recourses become more scarce as time goes on (seen in the cloudy regions further out on the plaques), temperate phages respond by going into the lytic cycle, a sort of hunker-down hibernation strategy

  3. Great poster and presentation! One question, how would you remove the represser gene? If this is a question that you are not able to answer no worries!

    1. Thanks for the question! I’ll copy the same response i gave to the previous question.

      Removing the repressor gene is a relatively straightforward procedure that has been done with success a number of times. It is however much more difficult than simply selecting a different phage to use as part of your cocktail, so if that’s an option it is generally preferred…
      Here are some papers talking about genetic modification of phages in case your interested!

      https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0437-z
      https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2019.00954/full

  4. Well done on your poster and presentation! You were very calm and composed the whole time. Quick question for you – in what situations do you think it might be more useful to use a phage with a lysogenic lifecycle rather than a lytic lifecycle? Is one better than the other in certain situations or in all situations?

    1. I’m only speculating here, but, I could imagine that using a lysogenic phage could be useful in A: having previously established a reliable means of disturbing the repressor protein (and thus inducing a lytic life cycle in lysogens) which could be executed across the entire body quickly, using a significantly more complex method of phage therapy where you were trying to transform an infection into 100% lysogens (which would require some kind of selective pressure which strongly favored the lysogens, perhaps a standard phage therapy), followed by the widespread disturbance of the repressor protein and the mass killing of all lysogens… or B: to use as a viral vector for gene therapy style modification of bacteria.

      I don’t have any thing other than my own imagination to support these ideas but I hope it was helpful!
      sorry for the run on sentences

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