10 thoughts on “P101 – Jones

  1. What are the implications of your results? It sounds like you obtained a lot of data about your phage and could obtain more, how does that link back to phages being used for treating antibiotic resistant infections?

    1. Hi Heather, thank you for asking this question! While a lot more data would be needed to better understand our phage, it is possible that our phage could be used for phage therapy to treat an antibiotic resistant infection. Our phage is lytic and highly active so it would do a good job killing all the infectious bacterial cells, making it a potential candidate for phage therapy!

  2. It is interesting that your group took a soil sample from a dead houseplant! Do you think that this impacted the type of phage you isolated?

    1. Hi Graycee, thank you for this question! I really like plants so I decided to use the soil from one of my plants! Personally, I wasn’t sure that we would be able to isolate a phage from this soil because it is not exposed to the typical conditions where Mycobacteriophages are found. I think it is possible that there was a lower concentration of M. smeg in this soil due to it’s isolation and that could lead to our phage being less active/infectious that it would be otherwise.

  3. I am not sure if my original question was sent in, but I thought it was interesting that your group chose to collect soil from a dead houseplant and was wondering if you think this impacted the type of phage you isolated?

    1. Hi Graycee, thank you for this question! I really like plants so I decided to use the soil from one of my plants! Personally, I wasn’t sure that we would be able to isolate a phage from this soil because it is not exposed to the typical conditions where Mycobacteriophages are found. I think it is possible that there was a lower concentration of M. smeg in this soil due to it’s isolation and that could lead to our phage being less active/infectious that it would be otherwise.

    1. HI Daniel, no M. smeg is not harmful to people. In fact we did not have to wear any PPE during this experiment!

  4. Why did you look for a phage within a soil sample of a plant? I know that that is where most antibiotics are found, so how do you know that your phage is different than something that has already been studied or found to be an known antibiotic or phage?

    1. Hello Macklin! The main reason I chose to isolate our phage from a houseplant is because I really enjoy gardening. I think it is possible that our phage has some unique properties because it evolved in an environment that is not typical for the mycobacteriophages that have been studied in the past (i.e. around a plant/roots/in nutrient enriched soil). However, because we have not analyzed this phages full genome, it is difficult to know how different is from other phages.

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